Summer Solstice 2017: How Will You Spend The Longest Day Of The Year?

Sun shining on the Caribbean Sea at Caye Caulker

June 21, 2017 (today) is the Summer Solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, where the sun is at the highest point in the sky. It is officially the first day of summer, and the longest day of the year as it is the day we have the most sunlight. In different parts of the world in a multitude of cultural traditions, the day marks a time of renewal and healing; a time to let go of/burn things of the past that no longer serve you. It is a time where self-care and self-love is extremely important.

I, along with many of my friends, have been going through a major shift. It can have many names, but simply put, we are at a time where we have found that we need to make many changes, whether they be very small or monumental, to move forward. Personally, I have been exhausted. I know a part of it has to do with my lack of establishing proper boundaries in my work and personal life, along with anxiety about my life path and future. Add in spreading myself too thin and not affirming my strengths to the mix, and you get one exhausted/confused/drained Andrea.

It can be extremely frustrating to work toward many goals just to have the rug ripped from beneath your feet, reverting you back to stage one. To be honest, at this point I have lost count of how many times the hypothetical rug has been pulled from beneath me, but what I am realizing now is that it was probably pulled for a reason. Maybe what I thought was the right path, wasn’t. Maybe I had to start again because if I went down my intended path, I would be greeted with unsavory individuals who do not have my best interest at hand. As a self-identified control freak (I am working on this), it would feel like my world stopped when something wouldn’t go my way. I would turn off from the world, fall into a depression, and ruminate on my shortcomings, negatively affecting those around me.

In shutting off from the world and finding almost too much comfort in solitude, you don’t hear what the outside world thinks. Yes, in the case of the outside world being negative, it is great to take time to yourself to renew and refresh, but how about when they have great things to say, and you are unavailable to hear them? An event that mirrors this sentiment just came up in my life last week, and it really opened my eyes.

Sunset at Caye Caulker

For maybe the thousandth time since I began the blog, I considered shutting it down, again. I have had trouble writing as I have been going through a lot in my personal life, and the act of just starting a post was quite debilitating. I would go through moments of skimming back on blog archives as well as my social media, trying to pinpoint when & where things went downhill. I couldn’t find an exact spot, but I did notice the places where my posts did not occur for months on end. During another wallowing in my sorrows moments, when I was simultaneously decluttering my space, I received a message on Facebook from a friend from college. I was actually surprised to hear from her, as we had not spoken in some time.

My friend, Damaris Vasquez-King, is a teacher at Soundview Academy for Culture & Scholarship, a middle school in the Soundview section of the South Bronx. She reached out as she had been following the blog, and wanted to gauge my interest in speaking to her students for a career day. I immediately said yes after I was told the date. Prior to this, I had never spoken to youth about my career path because I never felt sure about it, and thought I would not have enough information to speak on. I admit, I had to psych myself out a bit for the speaking gig, which was on June 15th, because I thought I would fail. To my surprise on that day, I did astronomically better than I expected.

I spoke to a group of about 24 girls in her class about blogging and freelance writing, a bit about myself, and what types of topics I cover. I was slightly nervous, but calm as the girls were very inviting, and genuinely seemed interested in what I was saying, despite being the last speaker of the day. Throughout my talk, Ms. Vazquez (Damaris) added how she used my blog as an example to her class of how you can use a blog/online platform as a place of positivity as opposed to malice. I almost shed a thug tear. I had no idea, and it really made me feel really proud as in that moment, I knew my words were positively affecting the next generation.

It is so easy in the realm of blogging to get caught up on numbers, especially when you want to work with big brands. Partnership deals are great and all, but if what I am doing cannot be a place of positivity or teach someone something new, why even do it? It shifted my focus completely, and since I have been thinking more deeply about my vocation that I believe was written way before I got here; to teach.

So on this Summer Solstice, I will be kind to my mind, body, and soul, and really dig deeper into what my next move is. Perhaps, I can teach you something.

 

*Photos by Andrea K. Castillo

#ALifeInTheDayInBelize: In Times of Chaos, Respite in Tobacco Caye

A view of Tobacco Caye

Writing about my travels is one of my favorite topics to cover on A Life In The Day of Andrea as I always include the photos I shoot whilst abroad. I must admit, I have not been very inspired lately in the realm of photography, and I knew that another trip with family to Belize would solve it. For ten days in August, I visited Belize with my parents, making it my eighth trip to the motherland. I brought my computer, but for the first time ever, I did not turn it on, and really took my time in the country as a serious vacation.

We had not made any concrete plans, but knew we would stay in Belize City for a bit of time, and venture south to Dangriga, where my mother’s cousin Sherry and her husband Warren live. For me, the spontaneous trips are some of the best. Whilst in Dangriga, enjoying nature and sipping on the freshest of coconut water, we were able to set up a day trip to Tobacco Caye with family friends; one who chartered a boat (as that is the only way to get there), and one who owned a property on the caye. My parents and I had never been to the caye, so for me, it was something new and exciting for us all to experience together.

Broken dock at Tobacco Caye

Belize as a nation was hit pretty badly by Hurricane Earl in early August, and its path was seen throughout the city and towns, with a plethora of debris, damaged docks, and structural damage to houses and buildings. Despite this, the people remained resilient, carrying on daily life and working through the destruction. At Tobacco Caye, Earl was present, mainly in the damaged docks, but aside from this, it was quite peaceful. Unlike larger caye destinations like Ambergris Caye where San Pedro is, and Caye Caulker, Tobacco Caye is tiny; stretching approximately three acres in the protected waters of the South Water Caye Marine Reserve which is a part of the Belize Barrier Reef.

After Earl

We took the approximately 10 mile boat trip from Dangriga to Tobacco Caye in a group of eight family members and friends. As it was a day trip, we brought all of our provisions to make a proper Belizean breakfast, juices and coffee included, as well as lunch. A standard Belizean breakfast consists of fried jacks (a fried bread similar to bake in Trinidad) with a side of guava jelly, refried beans, scrambled eggs, juice and coffee.

Making fried jacks

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Event: The New York Times Travel Show, Jan 23-25 @ The Javits Center

If you are a wanderlust and will be in New York City the end half of this month, you MUST put The New York Times Travel Show on your to-do list! Held on Friday, January 23 – Sunday, January 25 at the Jacob Javits Convention center. The show is the premiere destination for travel industry professionals, journalists, and enthusiasts alike.

THE MAIN FLOOR

Day one (Jan 23rd) serves as a Travel Industry Conference, with a full day of programming including seminars featuring representatives from various nations and experts, a keynote and lunch, and the opportunity to get a preview of the entire show before it opens to the public on Friday, January 24th. Tickets are $35 in advance/ $45 the day of show and may be purchased here.

CULTURAL PRESENTATION

The show features the following:

  • 500 + exhibitor booths from across the globe
  • 100 + cultural presentations from across the globe
  • 150 + travel industry experts and speakers
  • 20 K + travels & industry professional attendees

If you are a foodie, definitely swing by the “Taste of the World” culinary showcases which features seminars from different food impresarios with demonstrations! If you are bringing the little ones along, there is also a “Taste of the World: Kids Kitchen” for them to explore.

Consumer tickets are $17 and valid for one-day only. You may view more information about ticketing here. Hope to see you there!

#ALifeInTheDayinBelize: An Awe-Inspiring Trek Through The Ancient Maya Ruins of Xunantunich

The red ginger plant on the grounds of Xunantunich

Visiting Belize for me is a time for many things; a time to relax and unwind, a time to spend with family, but most of all, a time to uncover my roots, and the history of the country. For the past few years now, I have made it my duty to visit various museums, reserves, and archaeological sites in my trips to Belize, to learn more about the country’s rich, multicultural history. As the country is situated in what was once the center of the “Mundo Maya” (Mayan World), visiting various Mayan ruins is always a part of my journey. On this trip we visited the extremely popular, Xunantunich.

El Castillo, the main structure of the grounds

Xunantunich has always been on the top of my list of Mayan ruins to visit for many reasons. I had learned at a young age that the site has one of the tallest structures in the country, and that that structure happened to be called “El Castillo”. For me it felt like a duty of all Castillos everywhere to visit, climb to the top, and take in the glory of such a feat. And that I did.

El Castillo stands at 130 feet tall making it the second largest structure in Belize, after the structure at the ruins in Caracol. The structure is the center of the Xunantunich (Stone Lady) grounds, and is believed to be the edifice in which the kings lived. For this trek we had a lovely guide, of Mayan descent, who really gave us a full history lesson on Xunantunich, the rise and fall of the Mayan empire, and how that all equates to the current state of Belize. Our journey was simple; climb to the top of El Castillo, and learn more about it along the way.

The view on our way up the side of the pyramid

As I have climbed the ruins at Altun Ha and Lamanai in the past, I was not scared to embark upon El Castillo, but there was a significant height difference. Given the fact that this trek was years in the making for me, I did not let my nerves get the best of me, and pushed forward. The photo above shows the view looking up during our hike to the top.

The view from the top of El Castillo; just gorgeous

The stone steps leading to the temple’s zenith were steep and uneven, but sturdy nonetheless. As the space around me lessened, I will say that anxiety set in, but I wouldn’t let it hold me back from getting to the top. I took a quick break on the level below the top as I was sweating at this point, then made my way up the narrow stairs to the top.

What I was greeted with is what you see in the photo above; awe-inspiring greenery in an area of the country that is almost untouched. The site is less than a mile away from the Guatemalan border in the West, and you could literally see the country from standing on the top. I felt such satisfaction to have made it that far, like I was coming closer to finding some lost treasure. Maybe that will be in the next chapter of my travels?

Close-up of the frieze on the side of the structure

I took tons of photos, and had my brother take a few of me, which I decided not to include as I looked a bit tired and sweaty. I know, I know, I should have just included them, but I’m a little self-conscious, you know? I stayed at the top for about ten minutes, and I knew it was time to go down when this little thing called anxiety kicked in. For whatever reason, it was more difficult for me to walk down than up, as I imagined myself tumbling on one of the stones, and having a terrible accident. This, thankfully, did not happen, and I was able to take more photos, like the one above showcasing the detail of one of the friezes, depicting life of the ancient Maya.

When we were back on the ground, we took time to walk through the plaza, learn about the native trees and how the Maya used them in ancient times, as well as learn about their leisure activities. Exploring Xunantunich was by far one of the high points of my Belize trip. I feel satisfied that I made it, and am forever thankful to our tour guide.

But wait, the Belize stops don’t stop there. Look out for more adventures in #ALifeInTheDayInBelize!

*Photos by Andrea K. Castillo

#ALifeInTheDayinBelize: Simple Pleasures, Food, & Drink In Caye Caulker

The motto of the island, “Go Slow”

In my previous post on Caye Caulker in my #ALifeInTheDayInBelize series, I discussed the stillness of the island, and how much I believe it is a great place to unwind and reflect. In addition to its stillness, Caye Caulker is a wonderful place to enjoy a true Belizean culinary experience.

The entryway of Tropical Paradise

I’ve been spoiled growing up with the food of the women in my family, who put their all into Belizean cooking, never skipping a beat. Whenever I return, aside from the beautiful sites, I am very much focused on finding great food that is reminiscent of my family, if not better. Tropical Paradise is a hotel and restaurant that rings true to this.

Breakfast favorite, Lobster Scrambled Eggs w/ Fried Jacks

I’ve visited Tropical Paradise a few times in my years, but on this occasion I was truly set on good meals. Whenever you are out at caye, it is always suggested that you eat some lobster, and the restaurants in Caye Caulker have been making a breakfast of Lobster Scrambled Eggs with Fried Jacks for years now, the offering at Tropical Paradise being the most popular.

I ordered this breakfast my first morning at caye, and it was everything that I had expected. The lobster was fresh and sweet within the eggs, so minimal seasoning was added. The fried jacks, which in short are triangular pieces of fried bread, was the perfect density and flavor that I had expected. I finished my meal off with a fresh lime juice to keep it light, to truly savor in all the flavors I had consumed. My belly was full and happy.

Lazy Lizard, in all of its glory

At The Point of the island, there is a lovely beach bar called Lazy Lizard which is popular both with locals and visitors. The open air space takes up the end of the island with a two-story palapa bar and two piers in which guests can lay out and chill throughout the day.

The view from the point

I visited with a few family members, and we were lucky to get a little table by the water. We ordered buckets of the local beer, Belikin and Lighthouse, which offer six bottles for $20-$25, which is a pretty consistent figure throughout the country. I myself ordered Rum Punch, as I am not much of a beer drinker, and was pleasantly surprised that their main ingredient was watermelon juice. Not to worry, the punch still packed a kick, which I am all for.

A bucket of local Lighthouse Beer

In between drinks and stories, I made it my job to take a little swim in the water. Caye Caulker has great swimming grounds, but do be warned that the areas to swim near The Point are quite rocky, so keep your eyes open! The water is also quite salty, so I would recommend you bring goggles if you visit.

I would definitely recommend Caye Caulker to those that love an authentic experience with a small town vibe. With great food, drinks, and friendly locals, it is an awesome place to experience Belize in a relaxed setting.

*Photos by Andrea K. Castillo

#AlifeinthedayinBelize: A Time To Appreciate Stillness in Caye Caulker

Peeking through the mangrove into the sea

If the purpose of a vacation is to unwind, reflect, and take in your surroundings, Caye Caulker is the perfect place to do so. Located approximately one hour north of Belize City, Caye Caulker is a friendly destination that is both developed yet untouched simultaneously.

Red mangrove in all its glory

The center of the island, where all boats dock, is full of guest houses and restaurants for visitors (which I will touch upon in my next post), and the southern part of the island is a bit more rustic, covered in mangrove and trees with land that has not yet been developed. During my trip, we were able to explore this section of the island, as it was there that housed the new cemetery.

The beautiful stillness in the cemetery

Although trips to cemeteries are often somber, I’ve grown to appreciate their beauty as I grow older. We visited this site in particular to pay our respects at the grave of a loved one of one of our cousins, who had passed just before we arrived in Belize. He had lived a full life, so the feeling was more of peace than of sadness. Stories and meals were shared, and it was evident that his spirit will continue to live on in the island.

The seaside view of Morgan’s Inn

We stayed at the guest house that he built, Morgan’s Inn, one of the few places to lodge that really encompass the Caye Caulker experience. There are four guest houses in total, built of wood with sleeping quarters, bathroom, and kitchen, with nice verandas to catch the sea breeze. It was nice to stay there because I really felt like I was away, considering that there was no television or internet, I was truly able to immerse myself in the beauty and simplicity of the island.

Bouganvillea

I see beauty in so many things, but I was particularly drawn to the flowers. Bouganvillea is a flower native to Belize that grows in a bush. It comes in a variety of colors, more so in the red and pink variety. This fuchsia-colored bougainvillea bush really awoken my senses. The color was so vibrant, and the leaves were so lush!

I know this is all so simple, but these things that may seem so minuscule are really what keep me going. These are the things I love to capture and share with you all, because you never know how much a simple photograph, or set of words can inspire another person.

I will let off here, for there is so much more to share about Belize. Stay tuned!

*Photos by Andrea K. Castillo

#AlifeinthedayinBelize: Art & Sweets In San Pedro Town

Last night I dreamt of San Pedro….

Does that little tune by Madonna sound familiar? Did you know she was referring to San Pedro town in the beautiful land of Belize in “La Isla Bonita”? Well if you don’t know, now you know. In staying true to the beauty of San Pedro (aside from its gorgeous beaches and resorts), I wanted to share with you some local gems that are both creative and sweet.

Belizean Melody Art Gallery as seen from the street

As San Pedro is such a huge tourist destination, catering mainly to the tastes of North American visitors, it is easy to get caught up in the hype; the shoreside karaoke joints, restaurants, hair braiding, etc. Having visited numerous times, and no longer considering myself a tourist, I have discovered that the beauty of San Pedro is deeper in town, starting as close as a few streets away from the sea.

Being a lover and consumer of art, I always make it my duty to purchase artwork/crafts from local Belizean artisans on all of my trips. I’m reminded of such by my grandfather’s late wife, Miss Shirley, who always told me to “support your Belizean brothers and sisters”. Staying true to these words, I stumbled across the Belizean Melody Art Gallery on Barrier Reef Drive while perusing the streets with my mother, and decided to stop in.

A bevy of works inside Belizean Melody

Once stepping through the threshold, I was transformed in a space filled with artwork solely from local artists, which was refreshing. There were reminders around the space that mentioned that none of the artwork/souvenirs were made in China. Kind of cheeky, huh? Mom and I sifted through the pieces and ended up in a corner that housed homemade spice blends and freshwater pearl rings.

Mom near the spice blends

It was in this corner that we decided on our purchases. My mother got two spice blends to bring back home, and we both purchased delicate, freshwater pearl rings. You can see mine in the photo below.

My freshwater pearl ring

After admiring the local art and chatting with the sales associate at the gallery, it was time for ice cream, because it’s always time for ice cream! Directly across the street was the famous Manelly’s Homemade Ice Cream, a San Pedro staple since 1985.

Signage for Manelly’s

As this was a repeat trip to Manelly’s, I wanted to try a new flavor. The ice cream joint sells Belizean favorites in Soursop (Guanabana), Craboo, Strawberry, Mango and more, but on this day I wanted to try the Belizean Fudge flavor. Belizean Fudge refers to a dessert made with sweetened condensed milk, sugar, and butter, that is often mixed with nuts or raisins. The ice cream flavor was vanilla with generous chunks of peanut fudge throughout.

My Belizean Fudge ice cream cone

Disclaimer: this cone is EXTREMELY sweet, but it was such a treat. I’m really picky when it comes to fudge, but to have a great piece of fudge with peanuts (my favorite) in this cone was a delight! Can you sense my happiness whilst writing this? I hope it radiates throughout the computer screen. Along with ice cream cones and cups, Manelly’s sells fruit paletas, milk shakes, and waffle cones.

Full menu at Manelly’s

The ice cream really perked me up, and prepared me for the rest of my exploring that day. This is just the beginning of my series on Belize. Look out for more posts covering different locales and spots in the country!

 

*Photos by Andrea K. Castillo

Back From Belize, And Refreshed!

Outside my grand-aunt’s house in Belize City.

Living in such a fast-paced world, it is incredibly necessary to take that time to step back to reflect, explore, and re-charge. I had the opportunity to do so during the latter part of August as I visited Belize for 18 days. I used the time to be as offline as possible, although I did post some photos every now on Instagram when I caught WiFi. It was a time to be with my family and really explore the country in a way I had not prior. Usually, my time is split between Belize City (where the majority of my family lives) and Ambergis Caye (where our timeshare is located). This time around, we covered much more, visiting all corners of the country and meeting family, friends, and new experiences along the way.

Peeking through the mangrove in Caye Caulker.

In the Northern region of the country we visited Caye Caulker and San Pedro, which are big tourist destinations, in the center, Belize City and the nation’s capital, Belmopan, in the Cayo District in the West, Xunantunich (one of the most popular Mayan ruins in the country), and in the Sounthern Stann Creek District, the town of Dangriga (where we have family) and Placencia where we have roots and many family friends.

Sunset in Placencia.

I wanted to give you all a written and photo introduction to my tales of Belize. I captured a lot, ate lots of food, and have so much to share! Stay tuned for #AlifeinthedayinBelize!

*Photos by Andrea K. Castillo

Keeping It Real: Please Do Not Put Me On A Pedestal. I Did Not Ask To Be There.

THE CARIBBEAN SEA IN BELIZE

There comes a time when you just need to stop, reflect, and be real with yourself. That time for me is right now. I like to use this platform to fill your internet reading space with cool music, fashion, beauty, art, and food treats, but now, I feel the need to share a bit more about me, as a person.

Back in 2008 or so when I really began the road to creating my internet presence, I knew exactly what I wanted. I first knew that I wanted to brand my full name, and make it seamless across all platforms. At that point, for some reason, I projected my name being important for some reason. This was pre-blog, pre-Instagram, pre-celebs following me on Twitter, pre-being fake famous on the internet. In having the same name across all social media platforms, I use the same avatar, a professional photo that I believe to be polished. From an outsider looking in solely at my web presence, I appear to really have it together, I wouldn’t say “flawless”, but close to it.

This is the complete opposite of the truth. I’m a real ass person, with real problems, and real feelings, and real struggles. I am terribly far from perfect, but I am completely aware of this, and I accept it. I know that as a person in conversations, I have this sense of familiarity, which allows me to connect with all types of people from all walks of life. This is the main reason why I love interviewing people; I just love to hear and learn about the stories of others. I also believe this is a gift. I am often asked how I do certain things, and how I connect with certain people, and I often give the answer, “I just do”. I believe I can, therefore I can. I would say I am hardworking, and have a strong will, so I make it my duty to put my thoughts into fruition. Because of this, I am often placed on a pedestal for some reason, and this, I don’t really like.

When you are placed on a pedestal, you are not allowed to fall. Falling may be failing at a certain biz venture, execution of an event, a badly reviewed piece of writing, anything that is less than perfect than what is required to be on said pedestal. I’m extremely hard on myself as it is, and for others to have this inflated view is not what I want. I just want you to see me as someone who is working towards doing something that they truly love; that is allowed to make mistakes until she reaches her highest goals, and in turn, achieves her dreams. LET. ME. DO. THAT. That is all I ask. I’m in a rut financially, following my dreams and such, and if I can give any piece of advice, it would be this.

Don’t assume until you ask. Ask your friends, mentors, family, and those you admire about their path, and what they are doing, and have done to get there. You never know what hurdles people have to overcome until you ask.

 

Photo by Andrea K. Castillo

Take A Sip: Cas Rum Popo

CASRUMPOPOborder

One day in the holiday season of 2011, a young ambitious Belizean-American woman by the name of Andrea K. Castillo decided that she wanted to make tradition of learning how to create Belizean treats, and to make them well. In earlier years she perfected Belizean fudge, which is most likened to a more solid, yet crumbly, form of caramel, and in the year of 2011 decided she would perfect the holiday beverage of Rum Popo.

In layman’s terms, Rum Popo is the Belizean version of spiked egg-nog, homemade of course. It is in the same category of Puerto Rican/Dominican Coquito, Trinidadian Poncha Crema, Haitian Cremas, and Jamaican Rum Cream. The project for the first year was made strictly for family and close friends in recycled liquor bottles, in 2012 the first sales were made in the same packaging as the year prior, and now, in the 2013/14 holiday season, the product was named “Cas Rum Popo“, a tribute to the family name, and branded in a clean scale with fresh bottles.

casrumpopobotttles5
Cas Rum Popo in bottles, ready for customers!

The consistency of Cas Rum Popo is quite smooth with a bite from the overproof rum and spices used to balance its sweetness. It is consumed in the holiday months from mid-November to as late as February. All bottles of Cas Rum Popo are sourced from local businesses in Brooklyn, including the bottles from the longstanding Rappaport Sons Bottle Co. in Williamsburg.

If you are in the NYC Metro area and would like more info on purchasing, please e-mail casrumpopo@gmail.com, and follow on Twitter and Instagram @casrumpopo!

I left my heart in Belize…

San Pedro, Ambergis Caye. The view while waiting for the next boat.

Well not all of it, but a large portion of it. Belize is the motherland. The home of my parents and all generations before them. A tiny country located in the Yucatan, Belize is bordered by Mexico in the north, the Caribbean Sea in the east, and Guatemala in the west and south. It is the only English-speaking country in all of Central America, formerly known as British Honduras. It is a land I call home although I was not born there, my heart is there. My heart is in every grain of sand that lines the shores of the beautiful Ambergis Caye. My heart is in each stone that has built numerous colossal Mayan ruins. My heart is in the coconuts that overflow my grandfather’s backyard, which give water better than anything you can find in a can or carton. My heart is in the people, of all races and creeds, my heart beats in the people of such a multiethnic and beautiful land.

Hibiscus flower.

I visited my second home back in August. I go every other year, but this trip was particularly difficult as it was a large reality check for me. Prior to my departure, I had lost two aunts who basically molded my view of Belize, and who I so closely tied to everything that reminded me of the country, and my every day life while there. They were both very strong women in their own right, who were very influential in their respective communities. I am incredibly grateful to have known them, and shared so many fond moments with them both over the years. Along with my parents and family in the US, I count my aunts as large influencers to my love and pride for my home country. Here are some photos of my time abroad. I hope you can see the beauty that I see.

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Guess who’s bizack?

It’s me! I know I have been off the radar for a hot minute, but I am back and better than ever! The past month has been extremely busy, stressful, and relaxing all at the same time. I went on vacation in Belize, as seen in the photo above, to spend some quality time with the family and tan it up. Photos to come. I also started a new job this past week in sales and PR for a super fun handbag company. I’m putting everything into perspective and really looking forward for what’s in store for the months ahead. Woop woop!

Along with all of this, I’ve been jamming to tons of beautiful music lately. I wanted to share one of my favorite tracks right now by the the beautifully talented Mara HrubyIt is a cover of Jamiroquai’s “Alright” and she does it justice. Check out the music video below and rock with me now. 🙂